euphoriafish: Avar photo I took in Japan of the Great Buddha statue in Kamakura. (Default)
[personal profile] euphoriafish

Why we left LJ;

* It's really unnerving to get daily friend requests from stranger journals written entirely in a foreign language.
* Memes and other lazy blogging migrated to Facebook.
* Baby boomer journalists or comedians started making us feel bad about the personal and vulnerable nature of sites like LiveJournal and MySpace, saying we post TMI and are too whiny.




Why Dreamwidth is better:

* The access list, once configured, adds another nuance to privacy. I can be personally clever to anyone who might want to friend me, but if I'm personally weak it's only to less than 100 people who I know won't judge me.
* I still want an easily searchable archive of thoughts I worked out. Facebook notes are too ephemeral and don't have a tag system.
* I want a forum conversation where we all work out somebody's problem. Facebook comments encourage brevity and pithiness. If I write an LJ-sized comment on Facebook, it feels like I've committed a social faux pas. And over the years I believe this has encouraged shallow thinking.
* I don't necessarily long form blog everyday. If I publish them to Facebook they get lost in a stream of shallow short posts and meme photos and I'm lucky to get a single Like click, well,OK, I get lots of Like clicks because my friends like me and want me to know they saw the post, but they don't add their own thoughts to the discussion the way they did on Live Journal.
* I sort of despise chat rooms and IM conversations when they are the only way to become acquainted with people. I want well thought out arguments and for my friends to approve or disapprove my arguments by adding their differing experiences and perspectives in comments or messages.



I remember an old concern some people had on LJ about other friends seeing comments on a sensitive post, like when you're wanting to support a friend with a shared problem but don't want to attract attention to less popular norms and lifestyle choices. To this concern I only know that I would only let non-judgmental people on my access list to see those posts and I think access filters can be used to deal with specific social issues. And then include in the post that commenters can private message me instead of commenting if they don't want the rest of the access list to see their comments.

And to those who think LiveJournal bloggers are too negative and whiny, I say it all depends on how you use the site. I set a different avatar for my sad posts so people realize how rarely they occur, and another one for angry posts. I used to use a closeup of my face tinted green and some red letters against a black background for anger posts, and I sometimes use a cute-sad cartoon character for sad posts to remind myself that I'm being precious and it probably isn't as bad as I think really. I noticed some friends on Twitter do this too and it makes their cynical or off-color jokes less jarring emotionally. But true sadness and personal weakness is probably best for just-me or access list posts. So people who complain about that sort of thing or want to caution me that I'm hurting my chances at employment don't get to see those thoughts.

What I want for this blog is to connect it to my Facebook and phone habits to start real conversations there. Also, my creative writing brainstorming habit used to be solid but took a hit at the end of college when I abandoned LiveJournal and writing to focus on visual art ideas.

I think the two sites can be used together. I'll really be impressed if I find myself making and receiving more phonecalls but just feeling like I know my friends better and am no longer holding myself back from working out my negative feelings and stockpiling successes is a great start.

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euphoriafish: Avar photo I took in Japan of the Great Buddha statue in Kamakura. (Default)
euphoriafish

November 2015

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